Stakeholders

Note The MAKE-IT project started in January 2016 and is currently active; this website will be improved in the following months, please register to our newsletter in order to learn when new content or features will be available online.

In order to maximise the impact of MAKE-IT, the project will address a model of the quadruple helix model of multi- stakeholder collaboration based on four types of actors. These four types are crucial to the success of the social innovative and collaborative processes they are involved in, and include:

  1. Civil society actors (communities, associations, …)
  2. Research, facilitation and consultation actors (research entities or networks, …)
  3. Policy makers in the directly affected fields (education, research, social, technology, …)
  4. Economy actors (social entrepreneurs, funding and support networks, …)

Information You can also read more about MAKE-IT and its stakeholders on the D7.1 deliverable.

Society

1circle

MAKE-IT will address civil society actors (it is a basic assumption of social innovation research that social innovation cannot be successful without participatory collaboration of afflicted or addressed social groups). This includes also individual Makers and Maker communities and organisations. For example, MAKE-IT can help:

  • individual Makers by providing functionalities to Maker CAPS for collaborative project development and for interfacing Maker businesses with other Maker services and platforms. They may be interested in discussing such functionalities and seeing them in practice and experimentation.
  • Fab Labs, Makerspaces, Hackerspaces by testing and developing Maker CAPS functionalities for the coordination of city, regional or national networks of Makers and Makerspaces. It would be then interested in understanding more of how Fab Labs can organise collaborative networks among them. MAKE-IT can help them also by testing and providing functionalities for community and lab management; furthermore they may be then interested in understanding the role of CAPS in the management of Maker initiatives.
  • people interested in Making and Makers by providing easier functionalities for finding and networking with Makerspaces and Makers. Furthermore, they could work on connecting Makers with other citizens and citizen associations who lack technology and making knowledge but who may be interesting partners for Makers. They may also be interested in understanding how non-Makers can work with Makers communities and laboratories.
  • local associations by providing content and functionalities for opening discussions on strategies for the city and the neighbourhood with a specific focus on manufacturing and unemployment. These associations may be interested in understanding how Makers can be partners in this direction and how Makerspaces can also become local community spaces.
  • NGOs by providing functionalities for understanding the impact of the Maker movement, for example by visualising supply-chain and partnership networks in Maker initiatives and communities. Such organisations can help MAKE-IT by providing tools and input in managing strategic partnerships among Makers; they may be interested in understanding how Maker CAPS can be part of a sustainable way of managing business and community initiatives at global level.

Research

2triangle

MAKE-IT will address research, facilitation and consultation actors (like research entities or networks). This includes also Makers that work in research, facilitation and consultation. For example, MAKE-IT can help:

  • students by providing data and publications on the Maker movement; they may be interested in discussions and communication on how Makers structure their communities at local and global level and the organisation of their activities.
  • researchers by providing data, outcomes and functionalities about the social innovation side of Maker communities and how to improve and implement it at local level. They may be interested in understanding the role of CAPS in the lifecycle of social innovation initiatives with and for Makers.
  • professors, teachers and consultants in understanding principles and practices in participation of Makers in business initiative, and how Makers organise their business initiatives. Also, it can provide functionalities bridging Makers and companies in developing joint projects. They may be interested in understanding how the Maker movement creates value at economic level.
  • consultants by providing data, outcomes and functionalities for understanding how Maker communities generate economic value and how Makers can be engaged in developing business initiatives from their projects. They may be interested in economic sustainability and project management practices within the Maker Movement.
  • facilitators by providing functionalities and strategies on the participation of Makers and Makers communities in projects and local initiatives. They may be interested in information related to Makers and cities, Makers and participation and social innovation.

Policy

3square

MAKE-IT will address policy makers in the affected and needed policy fields (education, research, social, technology).For example, MAKE-IT can help:

  • deputy mayors by providing data, outcomes and functionalities for engaging Makers in discussions on policy making for urban manufacturing and unemployment. They may be interested in Makers, urban manufacturing and community participation and organisation.
  • education ministers at national level by providing data and outcomes on the size and dynamics of Maker communities; MAKE-IT can also develop and test functionalities for mapping and organising educational making activities and national level, in order to understand their impact. They may be interested in the size and influence of Maker communities.
  • Industry and Innovation ministers at regional level by providing data and outcomess on the economic influence of Makers in traditional manufacturing and size of the Maker Movement. They may be interested in Maker CAPS related to cloud manufacturing or pooling Maker business initiatives. Makers can also discuss policies with him on specific online platforms. He may be interested in the relationships between Makers, CAPS and industry.
  • director of think-thank institutes by providing data and outcomes on the political and organisational sides of Makers and the relationships between Makers, manufacturing and business statistics. They may be interested CAPS for the discussion of policies with Makers.
  • policy makers by providing guidelines and CAPS functionalities for project management and project development with VCs, Makerspaces, suppliers, etc.

Economy

4hex

MAKE-IT will address economy actors (including social entrepreneurs, funding networks and support networks). This includes also Makers who work professionally. For example, MAKE-IT can help:

  • startups by providing guidelines and functionalities for CAPS regarding project management and project development with VCs, Makerspaces, Suppliers, etc.
  • Maker CAPS and Maker business initiatives by providing data and functionalities for bridging them with other CAPS and by providing online spaces and processes for collaborative project development. MAKE-IT can also provide data and connections with other business partners for understanding how to develop better supply-chains and related business initiatives.
  • VCs by providing data and outcomes related to the business impact and dynamics of Maker communities. They may be interested in CAPS for the development of Maker businesses.
  • co-working spaces by providing guidelines and CAPS functionalities for project management and project development with VCs, Makerspaces, suppliers, etc. They may be interested in CAPS for the development of Maker businesses and the organisation of urban networks of Makers and Makerspaces and related policies.