Piattaforme digitali e progetti europei per maker

A panel with the Horizon 2020 CAPS projects MAKE-IT, OpenCare, OpenMaker in the maker party at Roma Makers, before Maker Faire Rome 2017, in order to discuss the projects directly with the maker community.

Le piattaforme digitali sono state molto efficaci nello sfruttare mercati dalla coda lunga per costruire ecosistemi, partnership e comunità. Alcune piattaforme si sono concentrate specificamente sul sostegno di pratiche democratiche che sono ecocompatibili, partecipative e basate sulla condivisione e la collaborazione. Queste piattaforme, chiamate CAPS, sono un esempio di nuovi modelli per diffondere la consapevolezza delle sfide emergenti relative alla sostenibilità e del ruolo che ognuno di noi può svolgere in esse attraverso l’azione collettiva. Un programma specifico dei progetti europei Horizon 2020 si è concentrato sui CAPS e alcuni di questi progetti hanno lavorato con il movimento Maker, affrontandolo con diverse prospettive e metodi. OpenCare, OpenMaker e MAKE-IT sono alcuni di questi progetti e in questa presentazione informale con la comunitá dei maker di Roma Makers discuteranno le loro attività e risultati.
I posti della presentazione sono limitati si consiglia di prenotare; per gli altri utilizeremo uno streeming che si potrà seguire tramite i canali social.

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Fablab Festival 2017

European makers & FabLabs meeting from 2017 May 10th to 14th in Toulouse, France.

The Artilect FabLab in Toulouse has been hosting the FabLab Festival every year since 2011.
At this occasion, FabLabs from France, Europe and all over the world gather in Toulouse to discuss, create and share their experiences with all the visitors coming to the Festival.

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Similarities, differences and interactions between the Hacker scene and the Maker Movement. Discussion on the 33rd Chaos Communication Congress (33C3)

From 27 to 30 December 2016, about 10.000 hackers, scientists, activists and interested citizens met for the 33rd Chaos Communication Congress (33C3) in the sold-out CCH trade fair in Hamburg. I was given the chance to present MAKE-IT with some first findings from our empirical case studies there to lead into a discussion about similarities, differences, and interactions between the Hacker scene and the Maker movement.

Figure 2: Decentralised congress organisation through crowd participation

After providing an initial input on selected findings from MAKE-IT’s ten case studies that capture the diversity of the Maker movement, and an introduction to MAKE-IT’s three analytical pillars organisation and governance, peer and collaborative behaviour, and value creation and impact, I moderated a discussion with about 20 participants who were mostly members and/or researchers of hacker-/makerspaces themselves. The discussion elucidated how the Maker movement has its roots in the hacker scene and how the first German makerspaces were founded as secessions from established hackerspaces. Both movements share tools and machinery as well as the mentality to open, reconstruct and modify things to understand them and make them accessible in the spirit you don’t own it if you can’t open it. Decentralization, sharing, social inclusion and practicing a hands-on imperative are core topics of both sub-cultures which became apparent throughout all aspects of the congress, including its organizational infrastructure. All tasks of the congress, from the recording and translation of lectures to ticket inspections and medical support were impressively executed by self-organised volunteer networks.

Figure 3: Hacker aesthetics at 33C3

It emerged from the discussion that the Maker movement consciously tries to set itself apart from the hacker scene through language and public imagery in order to resist the negative stigmata that surround Hackers in the media discourse and to be more accessible to the wider public. The Maker movement has, therefore, rebranded itself by giving itself a new name, adopted a cleaner aesthetics and established its own media outlets. While hacker ethics strongly inform the current maker ethos, makers tend to be much more pragmatic when it comes to acquiring external funding and collaborating with established institutions. This enables Maker initiatives to enter into cooperation with public institutions like schools and libraries and to carry the culture of hacking items and production processes into wider society. For a further insight on the topic, check the Analytical Report below.

 

Figure 4: Maker aesthetics at Happylab Vienna

 

TUDO Analytical Report: 33C3 2016

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